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News and Events

The Library shares news on its world-class collections, talented staff and informative events.
 
Find more events by visiting the Harvard Library calendar.

 
 

The Digital Dickinson

Sophisticated site gathers her poems, in her handwriting, for all to see and study

 
 

Events

 

Building on Strengths, Broadening Horizons: Recent Additions to the Collections of Houghton Library

Fri
Nov
1

Over the last five years, curators at Houghton Library have continued to acquire material in support of the teaching and scholarship which are at the core of the Library’s mission. Items in this exhibition, which runs through May 13, 2014, range from an 8th-century fragment of Theodore of Mopsuestia’s commentary of the Pauline epistles to a placard from the August 1963 March on Washington whose 60th anniversary was commemorated last month; from an early 15th-century woodcut still mounted inside its original leather box to playing cards which reflect the phenomenal box office success of Gilbert and Sullivan’s fourth comic opera, H.M.S. Pinafore, which opened in 1878; from the manuscript of Gilbert White’s sermons written between 1747 and 1753 and a record of the dates each was delivered to John Updike’s typescript with autograph revisions for his review of Norman Mailer’s The Armies of the Night (1968).

 

Women at HLS: 60 Years of Transformation

Fri
Nov
1

Since women were first admitted to HLS in 1950, female students have slowly but surely carved out a place for themselves on campus. This exhibit, which runs through December 13, 2013, explores themes such as enrollment, sports and recreation, campus improvements, and student organizations—particularly the Women’s Law Association.

 

Special Exhibit: Early Printing of the Declaration of Independence

Fri
Nov
1

The Harvard Law School Library is honored and delighted to display a rare and historic printing of the Massachusetts Bay Colony’s authorized edition of the Declaration of Independence. It was the means by which most citizens learned that their colony had declared independence from England. Ezekiel Russell printed this handsome broadside on or about July 16, 1776. It is likely that this is its first public viewing since 1776, when it was used to promulgate Congress’ message of independence from England. This exhibit runs through November 22, 2013.

 

Film Series: Songs of Struggle—The Radical Documentaries of Shinsuke Ogawa

Fri
Nov
1

Long overdue, this comprehensive retrospective devoted to the work of a giant of documentary cinema, Shinsuke Ogawa, will bring more than a dozen of his films to North America for the first time in many years. With this series, which runs from October 4 through November 10, the Harvard Film Archive hopes to re-focus attention on his extraordinary, incisive and deeply committed body of work. This series is presented with support from The Japan Foundation.

 

Religious Aspects of the American Civil War

Fri
Nov
1

A small sample of pamphlet sermons and other ephemeral materials, including hymn and prayer books used by soldiers, printed duriing the American Civil War are displayed in the Stendahl Lobby, second floor. 

 

It Changed My Life: The Feminine Mystique at 50

Fri
Nov
1

In 1963, journalist Betty Friedan described a malaise among American housewives who felt trapped by the expectation that they be fulfilled by the role of wife and mother. Friedan's assertion that women needed meaningful work to be fulfilled propelled her book to the bestseller list and began a national conversation about gender equality. The Schlesinger Library's exhibit, drawn from Friedan's voluminous papers, traces The Feminine Mystique from Friedan's initial research and drafts through its marketing and publication, and on to responses from readers, parodies, academic studies and anniversary editions. This exhibition runs through February 6, 2014.

 

Daylighting Research: Joint Creativity, Collaboration and Dialogue

Fri
Nov
1

This installation was curated by members of the Harvard Graduate School of Design student group, Women in Design, which serves as a forum to instigate dialogue about diversity, inclusion, interdisciplinarity and collaboration in design.

 

The Generic Sublime: Utopioids

Fri
Nov
1

The Generic Sublime upgrades the "unconscious" project of the skyscraper to the ultimate level of architectural megalomania: a complex building that integrates the territory in a synthetic—quasi-utopian—field of competition and synergy.

 

The Art of American Advertising, 1865-1910

Fri
Nov
1

The growing volume of mass-produced and mass-distributed goods after the Civil War fueled the creation of diverse forms of advertising media. The Art of American Advertising, 1865-1910 examines the ways in which an emerging advertising industry reached a national market with innovative printing technologies and marketing strategies that crossed the boundaries of art and commerce.

 

Library Lab Showcase and Movies

Tue
Nov
5

The Harvard Library Lab Showcase, a campus-wide exhibition of 23 funded projects that make original contributions to the way libraries work. All the projects were created by staff and faculty and developed with support from the Arcadia Fund. There won’t be any presentations—just browse the projects and meet the creators. Members of the project teams will be on hand to answer your questions, explain their ideas and show off their new tools. There will also be a showing of movies about each project.

 

Chair Yoga for Librarians

Wed
Nov
6

Are you a librarian with stiff shoulders or a cataloger with kinks in your neck? Do you have a mid-afternoon slump every day? Have you heard that yoga and meditation are beneficial to well-being but have you procrastinated trying? If you’re looking to make positive changes in your health, life or outlook, you’re welcome to try Chair Yoga for Librarians. The sessions incorporate very gentle, basic stretches, breathing exercises and meditative thought to help relieve tension and energize you for the rest of the day. No experience is required and there’s no need to change clothes or bring a yoga mat. 

 

Transversal: A Latin American Poetry Lab

Wed
Nov
6

Transversal celebrates and introduces four poets from Argentina, Chile and Peru whose highly innovative work has heretofore been under-translated into English. The two-day symposium will feature a series of poetry-translation workshops, exhibitions, curricular activities for Harvard students and a culminating bilingual reading of original poetry and translations specially commissioned from renowned Harvard and Brown University translators. 

 

Film Screening: Raising Renee

Wed
Nov
6

Directed by Jeanne Jordan BI '93, RI '03, 2001; starring Beverly McIver RI '03. After their mother dies, artist Beverly McIver takes in her developmentally delayed sister in this documentary by Jeanne Jordan and Steven Ascher. The theme of this year's film series at the Schlesinger Library is "‛Cliffe Connections: Films by Radcliffe Grads and Fellows.” Admission is free and open to the public.

 

Tour of Widener Library

Thu
Nov
7

Tours of Widener Library are offered every Thursday for all currently affiliated Harvard faculty, staff, students and visiting scholars. Conducted by research and reference librarians, the tour includes an introduction to Widener's collections, orientation to the facilities, including the reading rooms and the stacks and an explanation of services available to researchers. All tours begin just beyond the Security Desk at the main (Yard) entrance of the building.

 

Collecting Type on the Page: Printing History Libraries in America

Thu
Nov
7
Type Specimen. Cheltenham Old Style

Several ambitious printing history collections were created in the United States between 1890 and 1940, during what is often considered the golden age of American type design and print production. These collections both served and reflected the increasing power of the printing industry. That of Philip Hofer was the last-begun, and it is clear that he learned from the strengths and weaknesses of the earlier foundations. This talk by Paul F. Gehl, custodian of the John M. Wing Foundation on the History of Printing at the Newberry Library, will outline the typographic ethos of America around mid-century, and then focus in on the long and cordial relationship between Hofer and his colleagues at the Newberry Library in Chicago—three successive curators of the Newberry's Wing Foundation on the History of Printing (established 1919). A Houghton Library event.

 

Open Session: Connecting Our Users with Library and Museum Collections of Media Beyond Text

Thu
Nov
7

This session, organized by the Expanding the Boundaries of Authorship team, is designed for those who work with students and faculty in discovery and use of media materials from our collections. The purpose of this open session is to bring together librarians and museum curators, coordinators and educators to identify key issues, strategies, discovery tools and methods for finding and discovering media content and media resources available through our libraries, museums and other open access repositories in support of our users’ needs for authoring with media/multimedia. This session is open to all who share interest in this topic. 

 

Tour of Houghton Library

Fri
Nov
8

Public tours of Houghton Library are offered every Friday at 2 pm. Attendees receive a general introduction to the library, followed by a tour of the Emily Dickinson, Amy Lowell and John Keats rooms, as well as the suite devoted to the Donald & Mary Hyde Collection of Dr. Samuel Johnson. Those wishing to take the tour should meet in the Houghton Library lobby. Reservations are not required.

 

EndNote Basics and Beyond

Fri
Nov
8

Doug Nguyen, a trainer from EndNote, will be on both the Longwood and Cambridge campuses to offer training with EndNote X7. This is a great opportunity for both students and those who teach them to learn about X7's sharing and syncing capabilities and well as the rest of EndNote suite of tools.

 

Reel Time: Eliot's Auditory Imagination

Thu
Nov
14

Christopher Ricks (author of T.S. Eliot and PrejudiceDecisions and Revisions in T.S. Eliot; and T.S. Eliot: Inventions of the March Hare) will share highlights from his current research on a critical edition of Eliot's poems and his latest discoveries regarding the editorial pertinence of Eliot's own recordings, including those created by the Woodberry Poetry Room in the 1930s and 40s. Free and open to the public.

 

Access Services Brown Bag Discussion

Thu
Nov
14

The Access Services brown-bag discussion sessions for Access Services staff continues. Anyone interested in talking about Access Services issues is welcome to attend.

 

Access Services Office Hours

Thu
Nov
14

Matthew Sheehy, head of Access Services, will hold open office hours during which staff may stop by on a first-come first-served basis. 

 

Fifty Years After The Feminine Mystique: What's Changed at Home and at Work?

Mon
Nov
18

Scholars Stephanie Coontz and Ariela Dubler will look back at Betty Friedan’s The Feminine Mystique of 1963 and consider whether movement toward equality since then has persisted or stalled. What changes in women’s and men’s roles at home and at work have taken place? How has law figured in the balance? Do we have new feminine—or masculine—mystiques today? Sponsored by the Schlesinger Library.

 

Omniglot Seminar: Pessoa and Other Poets in Portuguese

Mon
Nov
18

Renowned Portuguese translator Richard Zenith will read from his translations of ancient Portuguese troubadour poetry; lyric poetry by Luís de Camões; the multi-voiced work of Fernando Pessoa; and the capacious poetry of Brazil's Carlos Drummond de Andrade. He will compare his experiences translating archaic vs. contemporary linguistic registers, highly formal poetry vs. free verse and European vs. Brazilian Portuguese. And he will discuss the unique challenge of translating a poet such as Pessoa, with alter egos that wrote in radically different styles. 

 

ABCD-Library Working Group Meeting

Mon
Nov
18

What is Web Scale Discovery and how does it work? The Harvard Library is currently evaluating options for a new web-scale discovery system. In support of this effort, this month's meeting will focus on the technical aspects of WSD systems.

 

The Reader's Eye: Between Annotation and Illustration

Tue
Nov
19

The 99th George Parker Winship Lecture, by William Sherman, professor of English at the University of York and the author of Used Books: Marking Readers in Renaissance England (2008) and John Dee: The Politics of Reading and Writing in Renaissance England (1995). Recent scholarship in the lively field of marginalia has treated readers' marks almost exclusively as a verbal phenomenon—as words, that is, next to other words. But in doing so we have lost sight of sight itself. Between medieval illumination and modern illustration, there are many traces of reading as a visual mode, signs that we have been slow to see and study and for which we are poorly served by both methodology and terminology. This illustrated lecture will consider the range of images produced by readers between 1450 and 1750, and will suggest that reading was closely bound up with seeing—and even drawing—across the Medieval/Renaissance divide.

 

Preservation Needs Assessment Update

Tue
Nov
19

Libraries across Harvard recently completed a preservation needs assessment to help identify preservation needs and risks to collections, both within individual libraries and across the Harvard library system. The assessment was designed and administered by Preservation Services, with support from a statistician from Harvard Law School. This session will provide an update by Brenda Bernier on the preliminary findings and next steps. 

 

E-Mail Management Workshop

Wed
Nov
20

This workshop will introduce methods for gaining control of e-mail and managing it according to Harvard records policies.

 

Tracy Spadafora's DNA Series: Artist Reception

Thu
Nov
21

Join the Cabot Science Library with artist Tracy Spadafora, one of Massachusetts’s best known encaustic artists, at a reception to view and engage her new work, DNA Series, inspired by the visual and symbolic associations of DNA sequencing.

 

Film Screening: Orgasm, Inc.

Wed
Dec
4

Directed by Liz Canner RI '03. When she is hired to edit erotic films for a pharmaceutical firm that is hoping to develop a female counterpart to Viagra, Liz Canner is inspired to further explore female sexuality and greater questions of ethics in the medical industry. The theme of this year's film series at the Schlesinger Library is "‛Cliffe Connections: Films by Radcliffe Grads and Fellows.” Admission is free and open to the public.

 

The Poet's Voice: Louise Glück and Katie Peterson

Wed
Dec
4

As the grand finale event in the Woodberry Poetry Room's Fall 2013 Poet's Voice series, two Cambridge-area poets of psychological and metaphysical acuity are celebrated: Louise Glück, whose collected poems spanning 50 years of writing has recently been published, and Katie Peterson, author of two new collections, The Accounts and Permission. A book signing will follow. Free and open to the public.

 

Women vs. Connecticut: Insights from the Pre-Roe Abortion Battles

Thu
Dec
12

Join Amy Kesselman from SUNY at New Paltz and Linda Gordon RI '14 from New York University at this Boston Seminar Series on the History of Women and Gender event, cosponsored by the Massachusetts Historical Society and the Schlesinger Library at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study.

 

Film Screening: True-Hearted Vixens

Wed
Feb
5

Drected by Mylène Moreno RI '87. This documentary follows two athletes playing in the first season of the Women’s Professional Football League. The theme of this year's film series at the Schlesinger Library is "‛Cliffe Connections: Films by Radcliffe Grads and Fellows.” Admission is free and open to the public.

 

How Can the Wife Submit?: African Families Negotiate Gender and Slavery in New England

Thu
Feb
13

Gloria Whiting of Harvard University will present, with commentary by Barbara Krauthamer from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. Part of the Boston Seminar Series on the History of Women and Gender, cosponsored by the Massachusetts Historical Society and the Schlesinger Library at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study.

 

Film Screening: Indelible Lalita

Wed
Mar
5

Directed by Julie Mallozzi RI '92. Lalita, an emigrant from Bombay to Montreal, contemplates her identity as her body is transformed by vitiligo, cancer and heart disease. Julie Mallozzi will be in attendance for questions and discussion. The theme of this year's film series at the Schlesinger Library is "‛Cliffe Connections: Films by Radcliffe Grads and Fellows.” Admission is free and open to the public.

 

Film Screening: Womanish Ways

Wed
Apr
2

Directed by Marion Bethel BI '98. Womanish Ways is a history of the woman suffrage movement in the Bahamas. Marion Bethel will be in attendance for questions and discussion. The theme of this year's film series at the Schlesinger Library is "‛Cliffe Connections: Films by Radcliffe Grads and Fellows.” Admission is free and open to the public.

 

What Are You Reading and What Are You Saying?: Reading and Writing Practices Between the American Revolution and the Civil War

Thu
Apr
3

Mary Kelley of the University of Michigan will speak at this Boston Seminar Series on the History of Women and Gender event, cosponsored by the Massachusetts Historical Society and the Schlesinger Library at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study.

 

Film Screening: Girlfriends

Wed
May
7

Directed by Claudia Weill '69. A struggling photographer and her best friend share an apartment in Manhattan until one of them decides to marry and move out. The theme of this year's film series at the Schlesinger Library is "‛Cliffe Connections: Films by Radcliffe Grads and Fellows.” Admission is free and open to the public.